Career vs. Job: Know the Difference





As a person who has been rejected a ton of times and hopped from job to job (including lay-offs), I thought it would only be fair to share my experience with career/job placement. I hope you can benefit from my message.

When seeking employment, you have to know the difference between a career and a job, so you can be more specific in your search. Simply put, a job is an assignment. You are paid to do a particular task(s) to satisfy production needs or service requests. There is usually little or no opportunity for advancement in your position. Though you may still be eligible for benefits and pay raises, your position does not increase in value.

A career is an advancement because it takes you a step closer to your destiny. A career allows you to move up within a company or organization and gain knowledge and skills that can be carried over into your own company. If you are not learning anything new in your current position, then you have a job, not a career. If you can’t move up in your current position, then you have a job, not a career.

On another note, your attitude can determine whether or not you have a job or career also. There are job-minded and career-oriented individuals. In other words, a person holding a career position has a job, if the individual is not mentally prepared to take on more responsibility or acquire the skills needed to advance. For example, a cashier at a grocery store will always be just a cashier, if he or she does not display the ability to take on a more important role, like supervisor or manager.

In summary, most jobs can become careers, as long as the individual displays readiness. If you know you are job-minded, do not seek a supervisor position just for a chance of earning more money. Instead, get a regular job, and supplement your income using your gifts and talents. Even if the employer is desperate enough to hire you, your term will be short. However, if you are seeking a career, be sure to research the opportunity for advancement before applying or accepting the offer. If not, you will find yourself job hopping. And that’s another topic.

And remember…
“Make sense of what you do, and make every cent count.”

What are your thoughts? I’d love to hear them.

Submit topic suggestions using the “Contact Me” page.







Photo: Flickr. Western Connecticut State University by Peggy Stewart’s Photo Stream CC

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I Was Good in 2016, But I’ll Be Better in 2017





As I close out the year, I think about those I may have hurt with my words, actions, or attitude. At times I was aware, and at times I wasn’t. I wish I wouldn’t have made assumptions. I wish I would’ve been more understanding. I wish I would’ve been more conscious and aware. I wish I would’ve spent more time listening and less time talking. I often tried to apply the advice I had given to others. Most of the time it worked, but sometimes it didn’t. I am a living witness of things being easier said than done. But, that’s life. You have to accept the good with the bad.

On another note, I wondered if I looked better than I did last year or if I looked worse. I wondered if people saw me the same as they did when I was in high school. I held my stomach in while taking pictures. I took over a hundred selfies and only liked a few of them. I wore clothes that should have been passed on because I did not want to accept my weight gain. I practiced smiling in the mirror, so I could always be picture ready. I liked my smile in the mirror but hated it on pictures sometimes. I often wondered what it would be like to look like the celebrities on television. I always thought I could use a little more tits and butt. I also thought my waistline could be thinner, and my legs could be a little thicker. I thought my hair could be longer and straighter. I thought my skin could be smoother and less oily. I thought my face could be slimmer and shorter. Oh, and I thought my feet could be smaller to wear those cut shoes. If I changed everything I could, I wouldn’t have been myself anymore.

I laughed, I cried, and I loved with my whole heart. But I wonder if it was ever enough? I spent a lot of time thinking, meditating, and praying to get answers on what my future would be like. I spent a lot of time caring about what others thought of me. I paid too much attention to who was liking my posts versus who was actually viewing them. I entertained frivolous matters that did not contribute to my success. I worried about money too much. I focused on numbers too much. I pouted too much. I shouted too much. I cursed too much. I complained too much. But I’ve retained the lessons learned in this year.

I know I won’t be perfect next year, but I know I will be better. Don’t judge me until you read to the end of this letter. I cared, I loved, I gave, I prayed, I forgave, and put others before me. I smiled to lift people’s spirits, not so others would adore me. I prayed for people I did not know. I gave from the heart, not for show. I listened to people out of compassion, not for the tea, gossip, or attraction. I let little stuff get me down, but I didn’t spread my feelings around. I got mad when things didn’t go my way, but I didn’t bring it into the next day. I didn’t get everything I wanted, but I maintained a fabulous image to flaunt it. I didn’t finish everything I started, but I gave my all regardless. I didn’t achieve all my goals, but I watched my blessings unfold. I stayed away from drama and avoided strife. I don’t have an appetite for foolishness, but I have a huge appetite for life.

I will change what I can and accept what I can’t, but just because I can doesn’t mean I should.







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Compete with a Purpose





Everyone has a mission specific to the individual. If people would focus most of their time and energy on finding their own purpose in life, then they would not bother to keep up with what someone else is doing. Competing can actually be a major distraction in one’s life. While wasting time trying to stay ahead of the competition, one’s purpose is losing its value.

Unless you’re in a contest, there is no need to be in competition with someone, especially if that person does not know. You will find yourself doing all you can to keep that person out of the race. That is not how you compete with purpose. You compete with purpose only when you have a willing opponent. Your friend, relative, co-worker or anyone you have an alliance with should not be your opponent. You can damage a healthy relationship by being in secret competition with someone.

People who are in competition have one focus, and that’s winning. There is usually some reward or other type of recognition for achieving the winning title. Hard work and dedication to any given challenge or assignment warrant a generous acknowledgement. That is fair and purposeful. Sometimes you don’t know what you’re capable of until you’re thrown into the ring.

For those who fail to offer their effortless support just to keep someone from being one step ahead of them, it is shameful. Opportunities are not scarce because they are created every day by the ones who overcome doubt and fear. People are so afraid of losing that they believe they can claim a position in the economy by keeping someone out of the race. This won’t work for a few reasons: 1) it takes at least two to compete (If you are the only one competing, then there’s no competition) 2) the person has to enter the competition (Once again, the person has to be a willing participant) 3) contestants must comply by the rules (People who are focused and determined don’t play by the rules) 4) a judge has to announce the winners (Winners don’t need confirmation).

black-man-racing

You see, while he or she is racing, the other person is pacing. The person who makes it to the finish line wins the race, but the one who makes it to his or her final destination earns the title. In the Olympics, the winner is not determined by winning one race. He or she has to compete multiple times before claiming the grand prize (title). Winning one race does not make you a solid winner. That’s called luck. You haven’t won until you’ve created a track record.

Instead of competing, collaborate. Synergy is created when teams compete, not individuals. Individual efforts can produce money, respect, and recognition, but collective efforts can produce wealth and power.

If you desire to compete, that’s fine. But when it comes to achieving life goals related to finances, you should not compete yet complete what you started in your own time and at your own pace. Take notes from those who are ahead of you, and commend them for their success or good fortune. When you make it to your destination, you will expect others to do likewise.

And remember…
“Make sense of what you do, and make every cent count.”

What are your thoughts? I’d love to hear them.

Submit topic suggestions using the “Contact Me” page.









Photo 1: Flickr. Competition by Mary Beth Griffo Rigby CC
Photo 2: Flickr. Decanation Charlety 2006 by Killeur_Lapin CC

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